How “South Park” Made It Onto TV

Trey Parker and Matt Stone were film school buddies at University of Colorado-Boulder and they thought they would do something “Christmassy” for the end-of-the-year student review. They had been cracking each other up with foul-mouthed little kid voices while sitting around film sets, and so they put those characters on screen using construction paper and crude animation. The audience loved it, and after a winding road, they convinced some adults at Comedy Central to approve the pilot. The rest is television history. Entertainment Weekly looks back at “The Spirit of Christmas.”

How ‘South Park’ was born: An oral history of ‘The Spirit of Christmas’

Microsites.EW.com, 3.18.15

Comedy Central’s Celebrity Roasts

The “roast” format, in which the honoree is the subject of jokes, needed a bit of revitalization at the turn of the century. Known primarily for bad dad jokes, Comedy Central updated the format on the strength of young and fearless talent like Anthony Jeselnik, Sarah Silverman, Patton Oswalt, and Pete Davidson. They brought an edge that made for compelling television, especially when you consider the prime meat offered up to them: Donald Trump, William Shatner, David Hasselhoff, Charlie Sheen, and more. Maxim chronicles the origin story.

Burned: The Oral F***ing History of the Comedy Central Roast

Maxim.com, 4.16.13